Jagged Little Pill (Remastered) Alanis Morissette

Album info

Album-Release:
1995

HRA-Release:
05.01.2017

Album including Album cover

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  • 1All I Really Want04:43
  • 2You Oughta Know04:08
  • 3Perfect03:06
  • 4Hand In My Pocket03:38
  • 5Right Through You02:53
  • 6Forgiven04:58
  • 7You Learn03:58
  • 8Head Over Feet04:25
  • 9Mary Jane04:38
  • 10Ironic03:47
  • 11Not The Doctor03:44
  • 12Wake Up04:54
  • 13You Oughta Know (Jimmy the Saint Blend) / Your House (A Capella)08:10
  • Total Runtime57:02

Info for Jagged Little Pill (Remastered)



„Jagged Little Pill“ won the 1996 Grammy Awards for Album Of The Year and Best Rock Album. "You Oughta Know" won the Grammys for Best Rock Song and Best Female Rock Vocal Performance. "You Oughta Know" was also nominated for Song Of The Year, and Alanis Morissette was nominated for Best New Artist.

With exuberant vocal gymnastics, Alanis Morissette offers chilling monologues from an outspoken and aggressive young performer. Her straight-for-the-jugular lyrical stance is given ample room to flex its muscles, and because of that very fact, „Jagged Little Pill“ is indeed a tricky swallow. Pushed into the public eye by the scathing single "You Oughta Know," Morissette's American debut (she had two Canadian releases as a teen popster) lives up to its title.

Recalling Siouxsie Sioux and Sinead O'Connor, Morissette's vocals coo and writhe, exuding a spectacular confidence of self, and letting her get away with lines like "I recommend biting off more than you can chew." The audio palette of flamenco guitar fills, distortion-drenched power chords and house-ready drum beats allow for Morissette to weave her songs in and out of genres, as easily as she goes through moods. Seemingly contradictory emotions come through in her feelings on falling in love on "Head Over Feet" ("You've already won me over in spite of me.../I couldn't help it/It's all your fault"). „Jagged Little Pill“ is modern and aware music from a daring young songwriter.

„It's remarkable that Alanis Morissette's Jagged Little Pill struck a sympathetic chord with millions of listeners, because it's so doggedly, determinedly insular. This, after all, plays like an emotional purging, prompted by a bitter relationship -- and, according to all the lyrical hints, that's likely a record executive who took advantage of a young Alanis. She never disguises her outright rage and disgust, whether it's the vengeful wrath of "You Oughta Know" or asking him "you scan the credits for your name and wonder why it's not there." This is such insider information that it's hard to believe that millions of listeners not just bought it, but embraced it, turning Alanis Morisette into a mid-'90s phenomenon. Perhaps it was the individuality that made it appealing, since its specificity lent it genuineness -- and, even if this is clearly an attempt to embrace the "women in rock" movement in alterna-rock, Morissette's intentions are genuine. Often, it seems like Glen Ballard's pop inclinations fight against Alanis' exorcisms, as her bitter diary entries are given a pop gloss that gives them entry to the pop charts. What's all the more remarkable is that Alanis isn't a particularly good singer, stretching the limits of pitch and credibility with her octave-skipping caterwauling. At its core, this is the work of an ambitious but sophomoric 19-year-old, once burned by love, but still willing to open her heart a second time. All of this adds up to a record that's surprisingly effective, an utterly fascinating exploration of a young woman's psyche. As slick as the music is, the lyrics are unvarnished and Morissette unflinchingly explores emotions so common, most people would be ashamed to articulate them. This doesn't make Jagged Little Pill great, but it does make it a fascinating record, a phenomenon that's intensely personal.“ (It's remarkable that Alanis Morissette's Jagged Little Pill struck a sympathetic chord with millions of listeners, because it's so doggedly, determinedly insular. This, after all, plays like an emotional purging, prompted by a bitter relationship -- and, according to all the lyrical hints, that's likely a record executive who took advantage of a young Alanis. She never disguises her outright rage and disgust, whether it's the vengeful wrath of "You Oughta Know" or asking him "you scan the credits for your name and wonder why it's not there." This is such insider information that it's hard to believe that millions of listeners not just bought it, but embraced it, turning Alanis Morisette into a mid-'90s phenomenon. Perhaps it was the individuality that made it appealing, since its specificity lent it genuineness -- and, even if this is clearly an attempt to embrace the "women in rock" movement in alterna-rock, Morissette's intentions are genuine. Often, it seems like Glen Ballard's pop inclinations fight against Alanis' exorcisms, as her bitter diary entries are given a pop gloss that gives them entry to the pop charts. What's all the more remarkable is that Alanis isn't a particularly good singer, stretching the limits of pitch and credibility with her octave-skipping caterwauling. At its core, this is the work of an ambitious but sophomoric 19-year-old, once burned by love, but still willing to open her heart a second time. All of this adds up to a record that's surprisingly effective, an utterly fascinating exploration of a young woman's psyche. As slick as the music is, the lyrics are unvarnished and Morissette unflinchingly explores emotions so common, most people would be ashamed to articulate them. This doesn't make Jagged Little Pill great, but it does make it a fascinating record, a phenomenon that's intensely personal., AMG)

Alanis Morissette, vocals (all tracks), harmonica (tracks 1, 4, 8)
Glen Ballard, guitar (tracks 1, 3, 4, 7-12), keyboards (tracks 1, 4, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12), programming (tracks 1, 2, 7, 12)
Dave Navarro, guitar on "You Oughta Know"
Basil Fung, guitar (tracks 3, 10)
Michael Landau, guitar on "Forgiven"
Joel Shearer, guitar on "Right Through You"
Lance Morrison, bass (3, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12)
Flea, bass on "You Oughta Know"
Michael Thompson, organ (tracks 3, 10)
Benmont Tench, organ (tracks 2, 5, 6, 7, 9, 12)
Rob Ladd, percussion on "Ironic", drums (tracks 3, 10)
Matt Laug, drums (tracks 2, 5, 6, 9, 12)
Gota Yashiki, groove activator on "All I Really Want"

Recorded 1994–1995 at Westlake Recording Studios and Signet Sound, Hollywood
Produced by Alanis Morissette, Glen Ballard

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