Skid Row (Remaster) Skid Row

Album info

Album-Release:
1989

HRA-Release:
23.03.2016

Label: Rhino Records

Genre: Rock

Subgenre: Hard Rock

Album including Album cover

I`m sorry!

Dear HIGHRESAUDIO Visitor,

due to territorial constraints and also different releases dates in each country you currently can`t purchase this album. We are updating our release dates twice a week. So, please feel free to check from time-to-time, if the album is available for your country.

We suggest, that you bookmark the album and use our Short List function.

Thank you for your understanding and patience.

Yours sincerely, HIGHRESAUDIO

  • 1Big Guns03:38
  • 2Sweet Little Sister03:10
  • 3Can't Stand The Heartache03:25
  • 4Piece Of Me02:49
  • 518 And Life03:53
  • 6Rattlesnake Shake03:10
  • 7Youth Gone Wild03:19
  • 8Here I Am03:14
  • 9Makin' A Mess03:36
  • 10I Remember You05:15
  • 11Midnight/Tornado04:19
  • Total Runtime39:48

Info for Skid Row (Remaster)

„The material on Skid Row is mostly typical pop-metal fluff, but since Skid Row was one of the hardest bands to find commercial success during the hair metal fad, the songs sound angrier and more aggressive than the lyrics and hooks might indicate. Part of this is due simply to the musical talent in the band, and part of it is due to vocalist Sebastian Bach; his tendency to oversing actually gives some much-needed nasty attitude to most of the songs, and when the music does match those sentiments (i.e., 'Youth Gone Wild'), the results fulfill, rather than merely hint at, Skid Row's potential. But the melodies and songwriting are pretty consistent throughout the album, even if they aren't as close to true heavy metal as they sound. The hit power ballads '18 and Life' and 'I Remember You' are musically generic, but Bach's over the top delivery makes them guilty pleasures as well.“ (Steve Huey, AMG)

Sebastian Bach, vocals
Rachel Bolan, bass, backing vocals
Scotti Hill, guitars, backing vocals
Dave 'The Snake' Sabo, guitars, backing vocals
Rob Affuso, drums, percussion

Recorded at Royal Recorders in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin
Engineered by David Kent, Michael Wagener
Produced by Michael Wagener

Digitally remastered


Skid Row
New Jersey kids, punk and metal attitude, determined to conquer the world. All for one, banded together with single-minded purpose. The battlefield was the stage, the songs their arsenal in an us-against-them musical coup d'état.

Top Ten singles. Gold and multi-platinum sales. No. 1 on the Billboard album chart. The world was theirs, the rebellion won, until there was nothing left to fight for — so they fought each other. Following an ill-advised South American tour in 1996, the band was finished.

But the core camaraderie never died. Skid Row returned to the big stage — literally — opening for Kiss in 2000. Exhilarated to tour with the heroes who rallied them in the first place, the band was reinvigorated by being underdogs who needed to come out fighting to prove themselves.

“When we put the band back together, we needed to reintroduce Skid Row as relevant without relying too much on past success,” explains bassist Rachel Bolan. “We wrote songs and hit the road. We sunk our heart and soul into it, letting people know we weren't doing it for lack of something better to do.”

ThickSkin and Revolutions Per Minute were battle plans for hundreds of live shows with singer Johnny Solinger out front, every night being a hard fought battle to win new fans and convince the old ones.

United World Rebellion — Part 1 is Skid Row coming out swinging. Rachel and guitarist Snake Sabo tapped again into the potent songwriting collaboration that built a band. Sabo says they were eagerly up to the challenge.

“We seem to be at our best when we're faced with adversity. It's us against the world again — and by us I mean the band and the fans who stick with us and carry the Skid Row torch without fail.”

New plans to conquer the world came together in an Atlanta recording studio. But it's a different time, a different industry, so they decided to record a series of EPs. “The idea really appealed to me,” says Bolan, “especially with the constantly changing musical climate. I like the idea of a steady flow of new music, as opposed to releasing a full-length album then riding it for the next two years.”

That guerrilla burst of recording a concise EP fostered a focused intensity that was liberating, says Snake. “The pressure seemed to be lifted. That immediately set me at ease and it became really exciting.”

Exciting and potent, prompting Solinger to exert the full range of his ability. “The third time in the studio as the voice of Skid Row was the proverbial charm, and the proof is in the tracks. United World Rebellion — Part 1 is the most meaningful work I've done with the band. It's definitely the most I've been challenged, vocally.” “The message in these songs was delivered on-target by each of us,” the singer says. “I approached it with every ounce of emotion I could conjure up, and I can not wait to unleash it live on stage.”

Recording the new songs meant capturing the signature Skid Row energy for drummer Rob Hammersmith. “That sound and energy is what resonates with people and knocks them on their ass! We had a lot of great ideas to work with, so we're all really excited about this new music.”

Classic dual-guitar teams are a key component of great songs — K.K. Downing and Glenn Tipton. Scott Gorham and Brian Robertson. Dave Murray and Adrian Smith. Add Snake and Scotti Hill to that list. “Playing as a team for over thirty years, our styles are still as unique as our personalities — as unique as our band,” Scotti says. “Combine them together on United World Rebellion and you have the Skid Row guitar sound.” That sound is rambunctious exuberance. They got older, but Skid Row never really grew up. United World Rebellion is still the youth gone wild, their musical spark still burning gasoline.

This album contains no booklet.

© 2010-2019 HIGHRESAUDIO