Album info

Album-Release:
1983

HRA-Release:
29.06.2015

Album including Album cover

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  • 1Pancho and Lefty04:47
  • 2It's My Lazy Day02:50
  • 3My Mary03:15
  • 4Half a Man04:13
  • 5Reasons to Quit03:32
  • 6No Reason to Quit03:15
  • 7Still Water Runs the Deepest02:46
  • 8My Life's Been a Pleasure03:24
  • 9All the Soft Places to Fall03:34
  • 10Opportunity to Cry04:01
  • Total Runtime35:37

Info for Pancho & Lefty

This duet between two of country music's biggest contrarians includes four Willie Nelson originals and one by his partner, Merle Haggard. But the most notable inclusion is Townes Van Zandt's title track, the story of two outlaws at the end of the line, which became the album's signature hit in 1983. In addition to their remarkable interpretations of the album's contemporary songs, Nelson and Haggard's weathered voices are ideally suited to their more vintage material, including California country music pioneer Stuart Hamblen's 'My Mary,' and two Texas Playboys covers, 'Still Water Runs the Deepest' and 'My Life's Been a Pleasure.' The album's relaxed feel is enhanced by its being done at Nelson's own Pedernales studio outside Austin.

'It's a sunny collection of songs that benefited from beautifully produced, piano-filled arrangements...' (Dirty Linen)

Merle Haggard, vocal, guitar
Willie Nelson, vocal, guitar
Grady Martin, guitar
Reggie Young, guitar
Lewis Talley, guitar
Chips Moman, guitar
Johnny Christopher, guitar
Mike Leech, bass
Gene Chrisman, drums
Johnny Gimble, fiddle, mandolin
Bobby Emmons, keyboards
Bobby Wood, keyboards
Mickey Raphael, harmonica
Don Markham, saxophone, trumpet

Recorded November 1982, Pedernales Recording Studio, Spicewood, TX
Engineered by Chips Moman, David Cherry, Larry Greenhill Produced by Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson, Chips Moman

Digitally remastered


Merle Haggard
Though for the last decade his new recordings have received almost no airplay—in the innocently cruel Nashville taxonomy, he is classified as a living legend—Merle Ronald Haggard remains, with the arguable exception of Hank Williams, the single most influential singer-songwriter in country music history.

Haggard is certainly one of the genre’s most versatile artists. His repertory ranges wide: aching ballads (“Today I Started Loving You Again,” “Silver Wings”); sly, frisky narratives (“Old Man from the Mountain,” “It’s Been a Great Afternoon”); semi-autobiographical reflections (“Mama Tried,” “Hungry Eyes”), political commentaries (“Under the Bridge,” “Rainbow Stew”), proletarian homages (“Workin’ Man Blues,” “White Line Fever”), as well as drinking songs that are jukebox, cover-band, and closing-time standards (“Swinging Doors,” “The Bottle Let Me Down,” “I Think I’ll Just Sit Here and Drink”).

His acolytes are legion and include many of country music’s brightest and lesser lights, as well as thousands of nightclub musicians. As fiddler Jimmy Belken, a longtime member of the Strangers, Haggard’s exemplary touring band, once told The New Yorker, “If someone out there workin’ music doesn’t bow deep to Merle, don’t trust him about much anything else.”

Haggard was born poor, though not desperately so, in Depression-era Bakersfield to Jim and Flossie Haggard, migrants from Oklahoma. Jim, a railroad carpenter, died of a stroke in 1946, forcing Flossie to find work as a bookkeeper.

Flossie was a fundamentalist Christian and a stern, somewhat overprotective mother. Not surprisingly, Merle grew quickly from rambunctious to rake-hell. By his twenty-first birthday he had run away regularly from home, been placed in two separate reform schools (from which he in turn escaped a half-dozen times), worked as a laborer, played guitar and sung informally, begun a family, and performed sporadically at southern California clubs and, for three weeks, on the Smilin’ Jack Tyree Radio Show in Springfield, Missouri. He also spent time in local jails for theft and bad checks.

His woebegone criminal career culminated in 1957 when, drunk and confused, he was caught burglarizing a Bakersfield roadhouse. After an attempted escape from county jail, he was sent to San Quentin. There, in a final burst of antisocial activity, he got drunk on prison home brew, landing himself briefly in solitary confinement. He was paroled in 1960 and, after a fitful series of odd jobs, got a regular gig playing bass for Wynn Stewart in Las Vegas.

Another Bakersfield mainstay, Fuzzy Owen, signed Haggard to his tiny Tally Records in 1962. After recording five singles there—the first release, “Skid Row” b/w “Singin’ My Heart Out,” sold few copies; the fourth, “(My Friends Are Gonna Be) Strangers,” entered Billboard’s Top Ten (1965)—Haggard signed with Capitol. He moved to MCA in 1976, to Epic in 1981, and in 1990 to Curb.

He released his first album, Strangers, in 1965. Roughly seventy feature albums have followed. Counting repackagings, reissues, compilations, promotional and movie-soundtrack albums, as well as albums in which Haggard has participated—with the likes of Willie Nelson, Porter Wagoner, Johnny Paycheck, Bob Wills, Dean Martin, Ray Charles, and Clint Eastwood—the number of albums is likely more in the vicinity of the 150 mark.

Haggard has recorded more than 600 songs, about 250 of them his own compositions. (He often shares writing credits as gestures of financial and personal largess.) He has had thirty-eight #1 songs, and his “Today I Started Loving You Again” (Capitol, 1968) has been recorded by nearly 400 other artists. Visit: http://www.merlehaggard.com/bio

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