The Right Time Ural Thomas & The Pain

Cover The Right Time

Album info

Album-Release:
2018

HRA-Release:
28.09.2018

Label: Tender Loving Empire

Genre: R&B

Subgenre: Soul

Album including Album cover Booklet (PDF)

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  • 1Slow Down03:21
  • 2No Distance (Between You & Me)02:24
  • 3Vibrations02:58
  • 4You Care Very Little03:23
  • 5Smoldering Fire03:43
  • 6The Right Time02:58
  • 7Gotta Say (I Love You)02:58
  • 8Time03:05
  • 9Show Ya03:04
  • 10Eenie Meenie02:50
  • 11Smile04:05
  • Total Runtime34:49

Info for The Right Time



It’s one thing to make a 60’s throwback record. It’s another thing to have been there in real-time singing backup alongside legends Stevie Wonder, Otis Redding and James Brown, to name a few. In the case of 78 year old Ural Thomas, it’s never too late to find The Right Time.

If life was at all fair Ural Thomas would be a household name, his music slotted into countless sweet, seductive mixtapes between James Brown, Otis Redding, and Stevie Wonder (all of whom Thomas has performed with.) Straddling the line between hot soul shouter and velvety-smooth crooner, Thomas released a few singles in the late 60’s and early 70’s; most notably “Can You Dig It”, which featured backing vocals from soul luminaries Merry Clayton, Mary Wells and Brenda Holloway. Thomas played over forty shows at the legendary Apollo Theater before turning his back on an unkind business and heading home to Portland, OR.

It goes without saying that a man practically built out of rhythm would never stop playing music. Thomas began hosting a regular Sunday night jam session at his home that ran for nearly twenty years. A de facto mentor to many of the younger players, Thomas reminds us all that “If you care about what you’re doing, you need to build those muscles and do the work. Don’t get discouraged, do it for love. Even if you’re digging ditches, do it with passion.”

In 2014, local soul DJ Scott Magee sat in on drums. The two became fast friends and at Magee’s urging Thomas decided to give his musical career another shot. Magee became the musical director, they put together a band, and in 2016 released a self-titled album on Mississippi Records.

In 2017 Thomas signed with Tender Loving Empire and began work on what, in many respects, will be his debut full length. Diving deep into lifetime of melodic creativity, Thomas and his band got to work. Recorded in Magee’s studio Arthur’s Attic, The Right Time features the air-tight work of Magee on drums, percussion, and backing vocals, Bruce Withycombe (The Decemberists) on baritone sax, Portland jazz scene fixture Brent Martens on guitars and vibraphone, Arcellus Sykes on bass, Steve Aman (Lady Rizo) on piano and organ, Dave Monnie on trumpet, Willie Matheis (Cherry Poppin’ Daddies) on tenor sax, and Jasine Rimmel, Joy Pearson, Sarah King, Rebecca Marie Miller on backing vocals. The Arco Quartet performed the strings, and the record was engineered and mixed by Jeff Stuart Saltzman (Blitzen Trapper) and mastered by JJ Golden (Sharon Jones, Ty Segall).

One might think after a sizeable taste of early success Thomas would be more than a touch bitter – yet the opposite is true. “We have to be positive if we want the world to get better” Thomas advises. “We’ve come a long way, but if you carry a grudge with the whole world you’ll stop your growth. We’re a family, all just brothers and sisters, descendants of Adam. You can’t get anywhere without an open heart.”

A developing artist at nearly eighty years old, for Thomas music has always been about bringing people together. “If we play for twenty people we cook it like it’s twenty thousand” says Thomas. “If we make someone smile we’re satisfied. They’re ain’t no difference between us. It’s all love and brotherhood. If folks listen to my record and feel that I’ll feel very blessed.”

Standing in bold defiance of the idea that aging is a reason to slow down and stop living, for Thomas the right time to get down is the next time someone plugs in a guitar or puts on a record. Ural is ready – are you?

Ural Thomas, vocals
Scott Magee, drums, vocals
Arcellus Sykes, bass
Brent Martens, guitar
Steve Aman, keyboards
Bruce Withycomb, baritone saxophone
Willie Matheis, tenor saxophone
Dave Monnie, trumpet

Please Note: We offer this album in its native sampling rate of 48 kHz, 24-bit. The provided 96 kHz version was up-sampled and offers no audible value! Hence the reason why we also don't offer the MQA!


Ural Thomas & The Pain
THE FIRST FULL-LENGTH album by Ural Thomas and the Pain has been a long time coming. The R&B revivalist group, led by the 78-year-old soul belter, has been kicking up dust in the local music scene since 2013, and bandleader/drummer Scott Magee talked about sessions for this LP at least two years ago. Considering the long path it took to bring Thomas out of semi-retirement and into the studio, the wait doesn't seem that outrageous.

Thomas was a singer on the rise in the mid- to late-'60s, releasing singles on UNI Records (home to Neil Diamond and Dead Moon precursor group the Lollipop Shoppe) and playing shows with Otis Redding and the Rolling Stones. But after getting run through the music industry wringer, he walked away from the business, returned to his hometown of Portland, and quietly hosted jam sessions out of his home. Enter Magee, a DJ with a deep love of vintage soul and funk, who befriended Thomas and convinced him to get back in the game.

With a few years of live performances under their collective belt, Ural Thomas and the Pain finally entered the studio and solidified their frontman's return. And if you've seen the band in concert, you know precisely what you're going to get with this self-titled double LP (out on Mississippi Records): a collection of heartfelt R&B that aims to replicate the glory days of the mid-'60s when labels like Motown and Stax were at their peaks.



<#!EN!#

Ural Thomas & The Pain
THE FIRST FULL-LENGTH album by Ural Thomas and the Pain has been a long time coming. The R&B revivalist group, led by the 78-year-old soul belter, has been kicking up dust in the local music scene since 2013, and bandleader/drummer Scott Magee talked about sessions for this LP at least two years ago. Considering the long path it took to bring Thomas out of semi-retirement and into the studio, the wait doesn't seem that outrageous.

Thomas was a singer on the rise in the mid- to late-'60s, releasing singles on UNI Records (home to Neil Diamond and Dead Moon precursor group the Lollipop Shoppe) and playing shows with Otis Redding and the Rolling Stones. But after getting run through the music industry wringer, he walked away from the business, returned to his hometown of Portland, and quietly hosted jam sessions out of his home. Enter Magee, a DJ with a deep love of vintage soul and funk, who befriended Thomas and convinced him to get back in the game.

With a few years of live performances under their collective belt, Ural Thomas and the Pain finally entered the studio and solidified their frontman's return. And if you've seen the band in concert, you know precisely what you're going to get with this self-titled double LP (out on Mississippi Records): a collection of heartfelt R&B that aims to replicate the glory days of the mid-'60s when labels like Motown and Stax were at their peaks.

Booklet for The Right Time

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