Hey! Let's Party (Remaster) Mongo Santamaria

Album info

Album-Release:
1966

HRA-Release:
24.05.2016

Album including Album cover

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  • 1Walk On By02:58
  • 2I Got You (I Feel Good)02:48
  • 3In the Mood03:24
  • 4Baila Dance03:58
  • 5Louie, Louie02:16
  • 6(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction03:45
  • 7Hey!02:50
  • 8Call Me02:45
  • 9El Bikini02:27
  • 10Shotgun03:27
  • Total Runtime30:38

Info for Hey! Let's Party (Remaster)

Let's party is right! Mongo and his Latin Soul combo groove through a tight tasty batch of tracks, with heavy conga from Mongo, and killer soulful solos by Bobby Capers, Marty Sheller, and Hubert Laws. The set's got a few soul covers – like "Walk On By", "Shotgun", and "I Got You" – plus some originals like "Baila Dance" and "El Bikini", and a nice cover of "Call Me"

„Hey! Let's Party represents one of percussionist Mongo Santamaria's first and most engaging plunges into the world of contemporary pop, galvanizing well-known chart smashes with the energy and abandon of Latin soul. It's a simple formula that proved remarkably successful and flexible across a series of likeminded LPs -- Santamaria approaches texts like "Walk on By" and "I Got You (I Feel Good)" with deep respect and understanding, creating soulful, righteous rhythms that snake in and out of the original melodies with brilliant precision. Even battered warhorses like Glenn Miller's "In the Mood" breathe new life, proving Santamaria's uncanny capacity for making the familiar funky.“ (Jason Ankeny, AMG)

Produced by Robert Mersey

Digitally remastered


Mongo Santamaria
Born and raised in Havana, Cuba, Ramón “Mongo” Santamaría established himself as one of the premier congueros (conga players) in the Havana dance band scene.

In the late 1940s he played with Orquesta Casino de la Playa, where he met Pérez Prado, and when Prado moved to Mexico City in 1948 to start his own band, Santamaría went with him. In 1950 he travelled with Prado to the U.S., where legendary bandleader Tito Puente saw him play in New York and recruited him for his own band. Santamaría played with Puente for six years, during which time his reputation grew with American audiences and musicians.

In 1957 Santamaría went to San Francisco at the invitation of vibraphonist and Latin jazz combo leader Cal Tjader and there he began to record his own albums, establishing himself as an innovator in the fusion of Latin rhythms with jazz and pop music. His cover of Herbie Hancock’s Watermelon Man reached Number 10 on the pop charts in 1963 and his own composition, Afro Blue, first recorded in 1959, became a Latin jazz standard.

Mongo Santamaría’s powerful playing and outgoing nature made him an inspiration to percussionists in diverse music scenes and helped make the conga drum an important instrument in U.S. pop music.

This album contains no booklet.

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