Live at Jazzhus Slukefter 1983 (Remastered) Hank Jones

Album info

Album-Release:
1983

HRA-Release:
23.03.2018

Label: Storyville Records

Genre: Jazz

Subgenre: Hard Bop

Album including Album cover

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  • 1Just Friends06:58
  • 2Au privave07:41
  • 3Flying Colors: Flying Colors: Alone Together09:47
  • 4Stablemates04:44
  • 5It Could Happen to You: And the Angels Sing: It Could Happen to You05:35
  • 6Scrapple from the Apple04:56
  • 7Budo07:02
  • 8Tangerine06:08
  • 9What's New08:25
  • Total Runtime01:01:16

Info for Live at Jazzhus Slukefter 1983 (Remastered)



The American pianist Hank Jones could, spanning his 65 year career, always be counted on for a joyful presence on the jazz scene, playing sparkling piano solos that uplifted every group that was wise enough to hire him. This set of previously unreleased music from June 6, 1983 puts the spotlight of one of the most consistent geniuses in jazz history.

In the 1970s and 1980s, Jazzhus Slukefter in Tivoli Gardens, Copenhagen, was the site for a large number of live recordings release by Storyville. Hank Jones brought Danish bassist Mads Vinding with him, a bassist with a large sound, the ability to take very original solos, and a love for straight ahead jazz. The third name on the stage was drummer Shelly Mane, whose career was as prolific as Jones’, and who added color and life to every group. This 1983 concert consists of nine jazz standards. Jones takes the lion’s share of the solo spots, changing his style between that of a classical bebop pianist and other times swinging elegantly like Teddy Wilson. The masterful trio comes up with creative variations and give all the songs on the release rewardingly fresh treatments.

Hank Jones (1918-2010) was born in Mississippi and was an early inspiration for his two younger brothers, both of whom would become all-time greats: cornetist Thad Jones and drummer Elvin Jones. He immediately became part of the jazz major leagues once he relocated to New York where he embraced the bebop of Bud Powell without abandoning his roots in swing. Tasteful and lightly swinging, Hank Jones would always be thought of as a class act. His non-stop activity with countless bands, orchestras and musicians only ended when ageless Hank Jones passed away in 2010. Musically, he never declined. The result of the 1983 Slukefter session is an enjoyable hour of music that, after sitting unheard for over 30 years, sounds as fresh as if it were recorded yesterday.

"Hank Jones disliked all categorization in music. Even the terms "jazz" and "bebop" were, he said, "degrading and destructive." He died at the age of 91 in 2010. The gently swinging, timeless elegance of his music is his memorial, no categories needed." (Chris Mosey, AllAboutJazz)

Hank Jones, piano
Mads Vinding, bass
Shelly Manne, drums

Digitally remastered

Hank Jones a member of the famous jazz family that includes brothers cornetist Thad and drummer Elvin, served as a pianist in a vast array of settings, always lending a distinctive, swinging sensibility to the sessions. Although born in Mississippi, Jones grew up in Pontiac, Michigan, listening to such performers as Earl Hines, Fats Waller, and Art Tatum. A performer by the time he was 13, Jones played with territory bands that toured Michigan and Ohio. In one such band he met saxophonist Lucky Thompson, who got him a job in the Hot Lips Page band in 1944, prompting Jones' move to New York.
Once in New York, Jones became exposed to bebop, embracing the style in his playing and even recording with Charlie Parker. Meanwhile, he took jobs with such bandleaders as John Kirby, Coleman Hawkins, Andy Kirk, Billy Eckstine, and Howard McGhee. He toured with Norman Granz's Jazz at the Philharmonic from 1947-51. As a result, he became Ella Fitzgerald's pianist, touring with her from 1948-53. These experiences served to broaden his musical palette and sophistication.
A consummate freelancer, Jones found work with artists such as Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Milt Jackson, and Cannonball Adderley. The versatility Jones acquired through such affiliations served him well when he joined the staff of CBS as a studio musician, remaining for 17 years. Although his studio work found him working on productions like the Ed Sullivan Show, Jones continued his touring and recording experiences in a variety of settings. His broad range and ability to fit in different settings also landed him in Broadway stage bands, where he served as pianist and conductor for such shows as Ain't Misbehavin'.
Jones was the first regular pianist in brother Thad's co-led orchestra with Mel Lewis, beginning in 1966. Throughout the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, Jones continued to be much in demand for record dates and tours. Among his affiliations was the Great Jazz Trio, a cooperative unit with Ron Carter and Tony Williams, who were later supplanted by Buster Williams and Ben Riley. Jones has also experienced his share of piano duos, with the likes of Tommy Flanagan -- with whom he became acquainted when both were developing around the Detroit area -- George Shearing, and John Lewis.
In 2008, Jones received the National Medal of Arts and the following year the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. As a leader and valued sideman, Jones can be found on thousands of recordings.

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