John Luther Adams: Ilimaq John Luther Adams & Glenn Kotche

Cover John Luther Adams: Ilimaq

Album info

Album-Release:
2015

HRA-Release:
28.10.2015

Album including Album cover Booklet (PDF)

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FLAC 44.1 $ 15.00
  • John Luther Adams (1953-)
  • 1Descent16:44
  • 2Under the Ice11:46
  • 3The Sunken Gamelan03:30
  • 4Untune the Sky12:52
  • 5Ascension03:08
  • Total Runtime48:00

Info for John Luther Adams: Ilimaq

Grammy-winning composer John Luther Adams always speaks with reverence about capturing “the tone within the noise,” and if any of his recent work can be said to take that mission directly to heart, it’s Ilimaq. A true electro-acoustic recording that channels the energy, passion and precision of Wilco drummer Glenn Kotche, Ilimaq (which loosely translates from the native Alaskan Inupiaq language as “spirit journeys”) maps a vivid, phantasmagorical progression through liquid cascades of percussion, otherworldly ambient soundscapes, harmonic dissonance, melodic convergence and almost everything that’s musically—and sonically—possible in between.

Of course, as the old adage goes, the “map” is not necessarily the territory—but in the right hands, it can come pretty close. Although they both live and work in different, almost diametrically opposed worlds of music, Adams and Kotche didn’t just choose to collaborate on a whim. Back in 2008, while Wilco was on tour in Alaska, Kotche personally emailed Adams and asked to meet. It soon came to light that he had been following Adams’ work for years; by the same token, Adams’ own background as a rock drummer gave him a uniquely informed glimpse of what Kotche had in mind. (As Adams says in the liner notes to Ilimaq, “...in Glenn Kotche, I’ve found the drummer I always imagined I could be.”)

In a review of Kotche’s Carnegie Hall performance of Ilimaq for the 2014 Ecstatic Music Festival, the New York-based blog Baeble Music described the experience as “...48 minutes of an almost violent but passionate performance. The one-man percussion orchestra was sonically heightened by the digital delays that blasted through the speakers. Though we were underground, Ilimaq seemed to seep into the New York City streets.”

John Luther Adams, all instruments, electroacoustic soundscape
Glenn Kotche, drum kit and percussion


John Luther Adams
composes for orchestra, chamber ensembles, percussion and electronic media, and his music is recorded on Cold Blue, New World, Mode, Cantaloupe, and New Albion.

Adams was awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Music for his symphonic work Become Ocean, and a 2015 Grammy Award for “Best Contemporary Classical Composition”. Inuksuit, his outdoor work for up to 99 percussionists, is regularly performed all over the world.

Columbia University has honored Adams with the William Schuman Award “to recognize the lifetime achievement of an American composer whose works have been widely performed and generally acknowledged to be of lasting significance.”

A recipient of the Heinz Award for his contributions to raising environmental awareness, Adams has also been honored with the Nemmers Prize from Northwestern University "for melding the physical and musical worlds into a unique artistic vision that transcends stylistic boundaries."

JLA's music is heard regularly all over the world. The Chicago Symphony, the Radio Netherlands Philharmonic, and the Melbourne Symphony have performed his Dark Waves for large orchestra and electronic sounds. Inuksuit for up to ninety-nine percussionists has been performed in New York City's Morningside Park and at the Park Avenue Armory, as well as many other outdoor venues throughout the U.S., Canada, and Australia.

Adams is the author of Winter Music (2004), a collection of essays, journal entries and reflections on his life and work in Alaska. The subject of his second book is The Place Where You Go to Listen (2009) his installation at the Museum of the North that translates geophysical data streams into an ever-changing environment of sound and light. The Farthest Place (2012), a book-length critical study of JLA's music, includes essays by Kyle Gann, Steven Schick, Glenn Kotche and many other prominent musicians and scholars.

Adams has taught at Harvard University, the Oberlin Conservatory, Bennington College, and the University of Alaska. He has been composer in residence with the Anchorage Symphony, Anchorage Opera, Fairbanks Symphony, Arctic Chamber Orchestra, and the Alaska Public Radio Network, and he has served as president of the American Music Center.

Born in 1953, Adams grew up in the South and in the suburbs of New York City. He studied composition with James Tenney and Leonard Stein at the California Institute of the Arts, where he was in the first graduating class (in 1973). In the mid-1970s he became active in the campaign for the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, and subsequently served as executive director of the Northern Alaska Environmental Center.

Glenn Kotche
For a percussionist and composer as energetic, inquisitive and versatile as Glenn Kotche, it’s his sense of balance—his ability to thrive in different and seemingly disparate worlds—that really makes him stand out as a musician.

Since 2001, Kotche has been the rhythmic anchor in Wilco, one of the most beloved rock bands on the planet. His first studio outing with the Chicago- based band was the breakthrough Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, and has continued over the course of five albums, including the Grammy-winning A Ghost Is Born and the critically acclaimed The Whole Love. He has appeared on over 80 recordings by artists as diverse as Andrew Bird, Edith Frost, Neil Finn and Radiohead's Phil Selway, and he’s a founding member of two other bands— Loose Fur, with Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy and longtime collaborator Jim O’Rourke, and On Fillmore, with upright bassist Darin Gray. He has also written music for classical and post-classical ensembles like Kronos Quartet, the Silk Road Ensemble, the Bang on a Can All-Stars, So Percussion, eighth blackbird and many more.

Unsurprisingly, Kotche has drawn the praise of his peers from all corners of the musical spectrum. “I could never find another drummer who was Glenn Kotche,” Jim O’Rourke told Time Out Tokyo in 2013, “because there isn’t.” In the program notes for Ilimaq, a piece written in 2012 specifically for Kotche, composer John Luther Adams observed, “...in the hands of a musician like Glenn, the drum set is a one-man percussion orchestra.”

Starting with 2002’s collage-like Introducing, Kotche’s solo work traces an arc of creative growth and vitality that reflects this wide swath of influences. On Next (2002), he explored improvised rhythms on prepared drum kit installations. Mobile, released on Nonesuch Records in 2006, implied the travel-oriented theme of its title, ranging wide with vibraphone, kalimba, hammered dulcimer and crotales; Pitchfork found it “...as rooted around high-brow concepts as it is in rhythmic dynamicity and melodic bemusement.”

Eight years later, Adventureland (Cantaloupe Music) proves that Kotche’s quest for new musical horizons still brims with the wonder of discovery— even as he stresses the importance of staying grounded.

“It’s a constant struggle,” he says, “but for me as a person and a musician, I’ve always needed that balance. I’ve been in rock bands since I was a kid and I’ve been playing in orchestra and concert band settings since then too. I’ve always had both sides, and they somehow balance each other. With Wilco, I’m creating something with five other guys; it’s a collaborative community. When I compose, it’s all me, so there is a whole different set of challenges. Obviously these are two very different avenues of musical expression, but at the same time, they inform each other. When I play with Wilco, it’s more than just laying down a beat. I’m thinking in terms of colors and textures. And I’m sure being a rock drummer influences my writing. Many of my pieces have more rhythmic energy than anything else at its core. They explore different ideas and questions I have about rhythm.”

Adventureland ripples with the spirit of experimentation, beginning with the textural and rhythmic leaps of the seven-movement piece Anomaly (featuring Kronos Quartet and composed by Kotche on drumkit, with each limb corresponding to parts for violins, viola and cello). The Haunted is another five-part epic—a dueling “pianos vs. percussion” suite that throws Kotche’s own prodigious rock chops into the mix, particularly on “The Haunted Viaduct,” which surges like a rollercoaster ride of layered sound. Throughout the recording, Kotche’s wide range of interests, from gamelan (on “The Traveling Turtle,” with Gamelan Galak Tika) to all manner of exotic percussion instruments and field recordings (on “Triple Fantasy,” with Kronos Quartet and eighth blackbird), describes a journey that’s rich in detail and discovery.

“What I have to say as a composer comes directly from who I am as a person. The experience of being a drummer in a rock band has a strong impact on what I do musically as does having a background in experimental improv music; they both, along with my sound installations, play into what I compose. For me, composing is about being honest with myself. I have a degree in classical percussion but I’m not a trained composer, so I bring a different approach and perspective. When I’m composing, I try to remind myself to bring it back to who I am as a person and musician – and draw from my experiences. That leads to something that is certainly interesting to me to explore, and it’s definitely honest.”

Booklet for John Luther Adams: Ilimaq

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