SLOWHEART Kip Moore

Album info

Album-Release:
2017

HRA-Release:
08.09.2017

Album including Album cover

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  • 1Plead The Fifth03:23
  • 2Just Another Girl03:48
  • 3I've Been Around03:37
  • 4Fast Women03:39
  • 5Bittersweet Company03:29
  • 6Sunburn03:41
  • 7More Girls Like You02:35
  • 8The Bull03:09
  • 9Blonde03:29
  • 10Good Thing02:50
  • 11Last Shot03:48
  • 12Try Again04:03
  • 13Guitar Man05:23
  • Total Runtime46:54

Info for SLOWHEART

With a wayfarer impulse, Moore followed years on the road touring building one of the genre's most fervent followings with an extended break exploring the rest of the world, including stops in Iceland, Hawaii, Australia, Costa Rica, Park City and more.

This time of reflection culminated in a striking sense of clarity, showcased in Moore's upcoming collection.

With a tip of the hat to 90's rock and roll, the anthemic "Bittersweet Company" is destined for a spot on the setlist of Moore's revered live show, as well as "Last Shot" with it's encore-ready, emphatic chorus.

Moore also serves an unflinching wake-up call in the form of the groove-driven track “Blonde,” while he lays bare a more vulnerable layer in the committed ballad, "Try Again."

Moore co-wrote 11 out of 13 tracks, and was the sole producer on seven of the tracks, as well as co-producing five more on the collection that is “between the rough edges of Americana, rock and the evocative storytelling of country, produced to let every guitar lick ring true and every edge and wail of Moore’s voice reverberate raw but strong” (Rolling Stone).

As he “consistently serves up clever roots-rock riffs and rhythms that separate Moore from the rock-meets-rap focus of his Nashville peers” (Associated Press), the release of “More Girls Like You” follows the acclaim that surrounded his sophomore album WILD ONES heralded as “an impressively singular release from Music Row” by The Guardian.

„While each of the 13 tracks give a closer look into Moore, it’s on album closer “Guitar Man” that best showcases the singer’s depth as a person and as a songwriter. Penned with frequent collaborators Dan Couch (“Somethin’ ‘Bout a Truck,” “Hey Pretty Girl”) and Westin Davis (“I’m To Blame,” “That Was Us”), “Guitar Man” has Moore sharing the struggles the life of a musician can bring. He laments of once having a girlfriend in Georgia who made him choose between her and his music. “She’s back in Georgia and I’m here with you,” he sings. The stripped down track also shares the joys: “The fruits of my labor / Is when the crowd sings along,” he concedes. With an album this good, Moore’s fans will surely be singing along loudly.“ (Annie Reuter, Sounds Like Nashville)




Kip Moore
combines a raw and rustic voice with compelling lyrics of honesty to create a unique sound that’s simultaneously hypnotic and edgy. His voice is weathered by life’s detours and disappointments and strengthened by his dreams and determination. His music is infused with relentless intensity, both of passion and frustration.

The boy who grew up daydreaming about life outside of the small town of Tifton, Ga., became a man who has been continually inspired by Bruce Springsteen and Kris Kristofferson to paint vivid portraits with his lyrics.

“I am not drawn to the fairytale kind of love,” says Kip, who had a hand in writing every song on his debut album. “I am drawn to the real-life experiences between a woman and a man. I try to sing about the way it is, but yet at the same time, what you can hope for between a couple. I don’t intend to paint of picture of what it’s really not.”

His music powerfully captures some of the contradictions that he grapples with personally. Although he’s from a large family and enjoys musical collaborations and performing onstage, he’s an introvert who is often more comfortable being alone. “There’s a combativeness to the music too, a fight within,” he says. “With ‘Faith When I Fall,’ I know how bad I need that spiritual realm, but yet I find myself on this other end a lot of times.”

Despite its edge, his music remains desperately optimistic. “I am hoping for what I have yet to become,” he says. “I feel like it’s hopeful for what I’ve yet reached, how I look forward to feeling, but I haven’t gotten there yet.

“I have truly lived my music to a sense, even the milestones I haven’t reached yet,” he says. “I have been in those moments. I’ve been at those crossroads with a girl: ‘Are we going to take that next step?’ I look forward to taking that next step, but I haven’t wanted to yet. I look forward to being ready for that.”

He was born in Tifton, near the Florida line, and was one of six children, the youngest boy who had three younger sisters. “You had to make your own fun, for sure,” he says of Tifton. “I had a lot of time for daydreaming. It was a great town, but I dreamed about getting out. I do enjoy going back now.” …



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